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RICHARD SERRA • Double Rifts

Gagosian Gallery, Beverly Hills, CA
April 17, 2013 - June 1, 2013

 

 

Emotion: Dark, Brooding - Omnipresent Emotion.

 

When one stands in opposition to a Richard Serra piece of art, the viewer is immediately drawn into a two way dialog. A visual lecture of paternal proportions that is at once informative but scolding at the same time.

 

Deeply textured but simple in its harsh use of shape, Serra’s oily black flat fields fray at their edges offering an occasional contrast of white that acts as a repository for clean, even reflection. This visual conversation is as intricate in thought as it is in Serra’s suggested simplicity of execution.

 

And, the conversation starts with the position Serra places the viewer - beneath them.

 

In that place, it is impossible for the viewer not to be struck with the fact that Serra’s works are almost always taller than you and that the man who created them and his intellect press down upon the viewer.

 

Shortly after that epiphany, the viewer feels the brooding of Serra’s harsh lines subside and suddenly a symphonic sermon emerges from the terse horizontals and verticals. In that moment, the viewer is released by Serra and surrounded by a great glow that is the artist’s hand. And the feeling around you is like that being in a grand cathedral listening to an artistic gospel delivered by an all-knowing presence from up on high.

 

And, that is what it’s like to be in a room surrounded by the dark, brooding emotional omnipresence of Richard Serra.

 

 

 

 

RICHARD SERRA • “DOUBLE RIFTS” was on display at the Gagosian Gallery, Beverly Hills, California from April 17, 2013 through June 1, 2013.

 

All Artwork is © Richard Serra

 

 

Review is © Ron Barbagallo 2013

© Richard Serra

All artwork is:
© Richard Serra. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

 

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ARTICLES ON AESTHETICS IN ANIMATION

BY RON BARBAGALLO:

 

The Art of Making Pixar's Ratatouille is revealed by way of an introductory article followed by interviews with production designer Harley Jessup, director of photography/lighting Sharon Calahan and the film's writer/director Brad Bird.

 

Design with a Purpose, an interview with Ralph Eggleston uses production art from Wall-E to illustrate the production design of Pixar's cautionary tale of a robot on a futuristic Earth.

 

Shedding Light on the Little Matchgirl traces the path director Roger Allers and the Disney Studio took in adapting the Hans Christian Andersen story to animation.

 

The Destiny of Dalí's Destino, in 1946, Walt Disney invited Salvador Dalí to create an animated short based upon his surrealist art. This writing illustrates how this short got started and tells the story of the film's aesthetic.

 

A Blade Of Grass is a tour through the aesthetics of 2D background painting at the Disney Studio from 1928 through 1942.

 

Lorenzo, director / production designer Mike Gabriel created a visual tour de force in this Academy Award® nominated Disney short. This article chronicles how the short was made and includes an interview with Mike Gabriel.

 

Tim Burton's Corpse Bride, an interview with Graham G. Maiden's narrates the process involved with taking Tim Burton's concept art and translating Tim's sketches and paintings into fully articulated stop motion puppets.

 

Wallace & Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit, in an interview exclusive to this web site, Nick Park speaks about his influences, on how he uses drawing to tell a story and tells us what it was like to bring Wallace and Gromit to the big screen.

 

 

For a complete list of PUBLISHED WORK AND WRITINGS by Ron Barbagallo,

click on the link above and scroll down.

RICHARD SERRA • DOUBLE RIFTS

© 2013 Ron Barbagallo